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Burn permits required in Idaho starting May 10th

Burn permits required in Idaho starting May 10th

From the Idaho Department of Lands:

WSU Veterinary College warns animal owners of tick paralysis

WSU Veterinary College warns animal owners of tick paralysis

From WSU News:

 

Warming weather in the Pacific Northwest always brings with it a renewed threat of tick paralysis in animals and people.

 

New study warns root rot could get worse

New study warns root rot could get worse

A new study warns that a fungus that devours the roots of Douglas fir trees in the Northwest could become a bigger killer as the climate changes.

Laminated root rot occurs from Montana to the Pacific Ocean and already costs the timber industry millions of dollars each year.

The Spokesman-Review reports that if the disease doesn't kill the fir trees outright, it leaves them weakened and susceptible to bark beetle attacks and uprooting during wind storms.

The study was overseen by the Washington Department of Natural Resources.

Public comment sought on Forest Group Chilco facility

Public comment sought on Forest Group Chilco facility

From the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality:

The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality  is seeking public comment on a draft Tier I air quality operating permit renewal for the Idaho Forest Group LLC - Chilco facility in Athol.

The draft permit extends regulation of air pollutants emitted from the facility for another five years.

The deadline for submitting written comments addressing air quality considerations is 5 p.m. MST, Wednesday, November 20, 2013. A public hearing may be held if requested in writing by November 5, 2013.

The permit application, draft permit, and related documents are available for review on DEQ’s website.

For technical information on the draft permit, contact Shawnee Chen, DEQ Air Quality Division, at (208) 373-0502 or shawnee.chen@deq.idaho.gov.

Submit requests for a public hearing and/or written comments on the draft permit electronically on DEQ’s website or by mail or email to:

Kingston man sentenced for illegally cutting timber

Kingston man sentenced for illegally cutting timber

An Idaho man was sentenced to three years probation on Thursday after pleading guilty to one felony count of willful injury or depredation of property of the United States. The Kingston man admitted to illegally cutting down timber from the Idaho Panhandle National Forests.

 

An investigation was launched by the U.S. Forest Service after it was discovered that 40 green trees had been cut withing one area. A deer camera caught 51-year-old Norman Leory Bogart coming and going from the cut site.

 

Prescribed burns begin in northern Idaho forest

Prescribed burns begin in northern Idaho forest

Officials with the Panhandle National Forest say more than 4,800 acres will be set alight in prescribed burn projects starting soon.

Forest Public Affairs Officer Jason Kirchner told the Coeur d'Alene Press that hunters and campers should check the forest's website before heading into the forest in the five northernmost counties of Idaho.

The Forest Service uses prescribed burns to reduce dead and downed trees and to selectively thin understory trees in dense forested stands. The agency says fire can stimulate fire resistant plant species, enhance forage for animals and reduce the risk of large uncontrolled fires.

Once burn dates or date ranges are set, the information will be posted on the U.S. Forest Service website as well as on signs along access roads, near trailheads and trail junctions.

Hazardous trees shut down Beaver Creek Campground

Hazardous trees shut down Beaver Creek Campground

After announcing Monday that crews would be checking all campgrounds for hazardous trees, the Idaho Panhandle National Forest has decided to immediately close and evacuate Beaver Creek Campground on the north end of Priest Lake. Crews found more than 40 hazardous trees that pose a threat to visitor safety at the site.

 

“Closing a popular campground before a holiday weekend is a terribly difficult decision, but in this case there are too many dangerous trees to remove before the weekend, so closure is our only option to ensure a safe environment,” said Idaho Panhandle National Forest Supervisor Mary Farnsworth.

 

A wind storm on Sunday knocked a 200 foot tree onto to the tent of Sandpoint man killing him. Following the the incident, crews have been assessing the condition of developed recreation sites throughout the Idaho Panhandle National Forest. Many trees across various sites have been identified and removed, but Beaver Creek is the only campground they have decided to close.