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Schweitzer welcomes first snow of season

Schweitzer Mountain got its first measurable snowfall over the weekend, which means the clock is ticking to get the slopes ready for the winter sports season.

"We always love to see snow in October,? Sean Mirus, market director said. ?Everyone starts getting excited, it's cooling off. Even though it may be raining down town, it's definitely nice to look up from the valley and see the white stuff in the hills."

For staff, that white stuff means something else, work. Mirus said it's all hands on deck to get the mountain ready for their anticipated opening around Thanksgiving.

?A lot of it has to do with how much brush cutting we can do and really, what type of snow falls,? Mirus said. ?The actual wetter, heavier snow is really good early in the season, it helps the brush and the foliage on the ground really lay over and so we don't need as much snow.?

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Shoshone Deputy shoots, kills dog

A Shoshone County Sheriff's Deputy shot and killed a dog after being bitten twice on Friday.�

Just after noon, the Shoshone County Sheriff's Office responded to an animal complaint in the Burke Canyon Area of Wallace, Idaho. An animal described as a "large dog" and a "pit bull" was running at large. The reporting party stated the dog at large was aggressive, keeping her from leaving her home.

Once the deputy arrived on scene and began to investigate the call, the dog that was reported as running at large advanced toward the deputy in an aggressive manner and bit him on the lower leg. As the deputy retreated from the dog, the dog advanced a second time, biting the deputy on the thigh.

The sheriff's office says that since retreating from the dog was an ineffective measure to neutralize the threat of danger the dog posed to the deputy, the deputy was forced to discharge his firearm, shooting the dog once. The dog died as a result of the gunshot wound.

The deputy went to Shoshone Medical Center, where he was treated for the bite wounds and released.

Local finalist in PETA's Sexiest Vegan over 50 contest

Local finalist in PETA's Sexiest Vegan over 50 contest

When you hear vegan, what's the first thing that pops into your head? It's probably not “sexy,” but that's what PETA is trying to change with their current competition for Sexiest Vegan over 50. The field has been narrowed down to just 14 men and women from around the US and one of them is from right here in Spokane.

Atania Gilmore is marking her two-year anniversary as a vegan this month. She's a runner and says it was another runner's book that encouraged her to make the change for what she calls selfish reasons.

“As a runner you're always looking for an edge,” she said.

Gilmore says it was “Eat and Run,” a book written by ultra-marathoner Scott Jurek that inspired her. In the book, Jurek explains that his record setting speeds to his vegan diet.

“I'm a turtle when I run,” said Gilmore. “I wanted to be faster so I thought it was worth a try.” So she decided to give it a try for the 30 days leading up to Thanksgiving and see if it made a difference.

Idaho food banks in need of milk

Idaho food banks in need of milk

Idaho's food pantries have a crucial need for more milk, and the Great American Milk Drive wants to make it easy to donate a gallon with the click of a mouse.

October is Idaho Hunger and Food Security Awareness Month, and United Dairymen of Idaho is encouraging people across the state to participate by making a $5 contribution for milk to their local food bank.

You can visit www.MilkLife.com/give and enter your zip code to ensure milk is delivered from the farm to a food bank in your community. You can also test “MILK” from your cell phone to 84465 to add a $5 donation to your phone bill.

According to Feeding America, the nation's largest domestic hunger-relief organization, milk is one of the most requested by food bank clients, yet there is a nationwide shortage because it is rarely donated.

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Free admission Oct. 25 at Museum of North Idaho

Free admission Oct. 25 at Museum of North Idaho

Saturday October 25 will be the end of the season free admission day at the Museum of North Idaho from 11 am to 5 pm. This will be one of the last days to see the feature exhibit Power to the Farm which explores how Kootenai Electric Cooperative (KEC) brought electricity to North Idaho’s rural areas beginning in 1939 and the impact it had on everyday lives. The exhibit, made possible by a grant from the Idaho Humanities Council and assistance from Kootenai Electric Cooperative, will run through October 31st.

Free IHOP Scary Face pancake on Halloween

Free IHOP Scary Face pancake on Halloween

Looking for a special way to celebrate Halloween with your Ghosts and Ghouls? IHOP wants to help kick off the festivities with a free Scary Face pancake for all kids 12 and under on October 31.

From 7 am to 10 pm, each child can receive one of IHOP's buttermilk pancakes decorated with a whipped topping smiles and eyes and a strawberry nose. Then kids can use a kit of delicious toppings – eight pieces of candy corn and two mini Oreos – to finish decorating the face however they choose.

If you can't make it on Halloween, don't worry too much – the Scary Face pancake is available as a regular menu item all month long.

FEMA wants you to participate in earthquake drill Thursday

FEMA wants you to participate in earthquake drill Thursday

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is encouraging participation in a national earthquake drill this Thursday, October 16.

FEMA says over 40 states are at risk of earthquakes, but surveys report fewer than one-third of adults have participated in a drill in the last year. That's why they're spreading the word about this year's Great ShakeOut.

“Past practice and previous participation in a drill can make all the difference in an emergency,” FEMA administrator Craig Fugate said. “Everyone should know how to drop to the ground, cover themselves under a sturdy table or desk, and hold on to it until the shaking stops. It needs to happen with enough regularity that it becomes second nature during an actual earthquake.

At 10:16 am local time, participants should do the following: